Stand-Up Lifts Frequently Asked Questions


What is a portable stand-up lift?


Stand-up lifts are used to transfer residents from one seating surface to another. A stand-up lift is designed to support only the upper body of the resident and requires that the resident have some weight-bearing capability. A stand-up lift is designed to replace manual stand and pivot transfers. This lift is different than the full body lift that supports the entire weight of the resident.


What are the benefits of using a stand-up lift?


Manual lifting of a resident poses a real risk of injury to caregivers and residents. Stand-up lifts greatly minimize caregiver back and shoulder injuries. In addition, stand-up lifts are much safer for the resident because they are designed to help support the weight of the resident. During manual stand and pivot transfers, the caregiver must rely on her own strength and physical capabilities, resulting in a greater risk of dropping or mishandling the resident. Invacare lifts are very stable and require very little force to push or pull even with a heavy person in the sling. Invacare slings are designed to reduce the risk of skin tear and abrasion. Stand-up lifts are designed to quickly transfer a resident between two seated surfaces which eliminates two or three manual transfers when toileting or showering a resident. Instead of manually transferring a resident from a bed to a wheelchair, wheelchair to commode and then commode back to the wheelchair, a stand-up lift can be used to move the resident from bed directly to the commode, thus reducing the number of transfers.


Should a stand-up lift be used for all residents?


No. A stand-up lift should only be used for residents who can bear some of their own weight. Use of the stand-up lift requires that the resident to able to sit up on the edge of the bed with or without assistance and be able to bend his hips, knees and ankles. For those residents that can bear some body weight, a stand-up lift can also be a helpful rehabilitation tool. It can be used to promote increased weight bearing by controlling the resident's position. The closer the resident is to being upright, the more weight his lower extremities will be bearing.


What are the most important features to consider when buying a stand-up lift?



What type of sling should be used with a stand-up lift?


The standing sling is proper to use for transferring residents who are partially dependent, have at least 60% weight-bearing capacity, have head and neck control, are cooperative, can sit up on the edge of the bed (with or without assistance), and are able to bend at the hips, knees and ankles. Use the standing sling for standing assistance, quick toileting, weight bearing practice and for transferring resident from bed to chair, or chair to bed. The standing sling is for transferring residents with minimal weight-bearing capacity, who have head and neck control, are cooperative, can sit up on the edge of the bed (with or without assistance), and are able to bend at the hips, knees and ankles. Use the standing sling for transferring resident from bed to chair, or chair to commode, chair to car or general in-room transport.